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Friday, September 16, 2011

Dead Boer Walking


I’ve just discovered a new book called, “Dead Boer Walking: Whites have Rights too”, written by Renate Ackerman. Only the Kindle Edition is available, dated 13 Sept. 2011.

Product Description from Amazon.com:
Nobody was more hated amongst black terrorist groups in South Africa than Susan Van Der Merwe. Her investigations in to racist attacks on whites made her few friends and powerful enemies. In this extraordinary story and first hand account she explains how blacks threatened to kill her if she did not stop her enquires in to racist attacks on Boers, how they threatened to kill her friends and family when she refused to be intimidated, and how she ended up the number one target on a black terrorist hit list called Boerwatch. Her most terrifying moment came when she was shot and left for dead outside President Mandela’s house. This is the tale of one woman’s determination to stand up to racism and ethnic cleansing against her community and uphold the conservative values she believes.


Product details:
Format: Kindle Edition
File Size: 210 KB
Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
Language: English
ASIN: B005N0MW2G

Amazon (US)Amazon (UK)

Although I have not purchased this product yet, and there’s absolutely zero reviews or other info available online about it, I strongly suspect this may be the same Susan van der Merwe whose husband (a farmer) went missing at Buffelsdrift, at the border post between South Africa and Botswana on 1 November 1978. It was later established, in 1982, that her husband was murdered by MK cadres. Evidence came to light that van der Merwe stopped to pick up black men walking along the road to Thabazimbi. Once in the car, they pulled out guns and forced the farmer to drive in the opposite direction. They then walked Mr. Van der Merwe out into the bush and executed him, and drove his car to the border. One MK cadre led police to the scene, but the body was never found. More details about this incident can be viewed on the website of The Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR)


Note how both Amazon (US) and Amazon (UK) have corrupted the heading of this publication on their pages. The second part reads: “Rights have Whites too.”

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