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Friday, July 22, 2011

A sad tale of two countries that loved one another


This posting will present, among other facts, some information about a forgotten African leader and the country he governed. Please take note that in the first few paragraphs of this posting, I’ve deliberately made an effort NOT to mention the African country in question, nor its leader’s name. I’ve done this to keep the reader guessing, while simultaneously hammering a point home. The ‘point’ will become apparent long before this posting ends, but in short - it presents a brief comparison-rundown of two African countries, who were both pressurized, in the same historical timeframe, to adopt democracy, or else!

The African Leader - Brief background of personal life:

The exact date of birth of the African leader is unknown, as it took place at a time when there was no birth registration. February 1898 has been suggested as the most likely date.

In 1917, he trekked from Zimbabwe to Johannesburg where he worked in the mines till 1925. He left for New York the same year and did his high school at Wilberforce Institute, the current Central State University in Ohio. He graduated in 1928 and was transferred to University of Chicago where he graduated with a B Phil, majoring in history, in 1931. He studied medicine at Meharry Medical College and qualified as a doctor in 1937. He was forced to get a second medical degree to qualify to practise in the British Empire. He got the degree from the University of Edinburgh in 1941, and practised medicine in Newcastle and London for five years before entering the African political scene.

He was mostly viewed externally as a benign, albeit eccentric, leader, an image fostered by his English-style three-piece suits, matching handkerchiefs and fly-whisk. In June 1967, he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Massachusetts with the encomium ". . . pediatrician to his infant nation".

He ruled his country as President for 33 years, from 1961 to 1994, and was considered by many as one of Africa’s most influential leaders in the last 50 years.

He once stood up in Addis Ababa to give an inaugural speech that effectively denied Egyptian fighter planes permission to enter his country’s airspace on a planned program to bomb South Africa, which had just jailed all its Black leaders, including Nelson Mandela. No other African leaders would thereafter consort with him.

He died in a hospital in South Africa in 1997, reportedly at the age of 99. He remained a ‘bachelor’ till death.


***********************************

The Black African country, governed by this eccentric English-speaking Black gentleman, had very strong diplomatic relations with apartheid-era South Africa, but while the friendship bonds between these two countries grew stronger, the western world started applying more pressure for so-called freedom and democratic change to take place, in both countries!

Bear in mind that the government structures of the African country under discussion was entirely and completely a Black African non-democratic, one party state! Furthermore, there were no political upheavals in the country, the crime rate was near zero, no one was starving of hunger, no one was rioting, and nobody was killing anybody!

The ‘killers’ armed with AK-47 rifles and Soviet RPG rocket launchers were sent in later, from neighbouring states that had already fallen into the hands of hardened Marxist-Communists – expertly trained in the art of terror by the very same masters behind the implementation of ‘democratic’ freedom for all!

The two respective countries targeted by the West were not even neighbouring countries, they were miles apart from each other, and separated by two other countries. Besides trade agreements between them, which existed since 1967, another binding cause between the two countries was the belief that the roots of a nations stability and prosperity should be firmly embedded in Christian values and morals, something that ‘democracy’ does not foster!

The African country was just as determined as South Africa when it came to issues of upholding strict values and morals. For example: Those wishing to get visas to the country in the 1970s were met with the following notice:
‘Female passengers will not be permitted to enter the country if wearing short dresses or trouser suit, except in transit or at lake holiday resorts or national parks. Skirts and dresses must cover the knees to conform with government regulations. The entry of hippies and men with long hair and flared trousers is forbidden’.

The African country was far more meticulous than South Africa when it came to implementing ‘penalty’ actions. Any foreigner who violated the rules was summarily deported. However, this was a rule they only enforced in extreme cases. European foreigners visiting the country, including White people from South Africa, could rest assured that they would never be harassed, robbed, raped, or murdered while visiting the country. On the contrary, the friendly hospitality of that country, coupled with its tranquil natural beauty, was the motivational grounds for visitors wanting to return time and again.

The African leader argued that the dress code was not instilled to oppress women but to encourage honour and respect for them. He turned his words into action and was very supportive of women's rights compared to other African rulers during his reign. He motivated women to excel both in education and government and encouraged them to play more active roles in their community, church and family.

The one-eyed monster (television) was banned, and was kept out of the African country until the 1990’s. Television in South Africa was first introduced in 1976.

All movies shown in theaters in the Black African country were first viewed by a Censorship Board and edited for content. Even videotapes, used for private viewing, had to first be sent to the Censorship Board for approval.  All satanic-inspired publications such as, Newsweek and TIME,  were also edited. Whole pages, or parts of pages, were cut out of the magazines before they could be sold. It goes without saying that the press and radio were tightly controlled too!

In South Africa the Blacks who worked or lived outside their designated "homelands", had to carry passbooks. These regulations sparked worldwide condemnation and outrage, and the ANC began the Defiance Campaign to oppose the pass laws. In the other Black African country there was a similar rule. It was compulsory for all adults to carry membership cards of the one-and-only political party in the country. The party cards were to be carried at all times because of random police checks, but guess what?  Not one individual in that African country ever complained, and life continued on its normal peaceful course.



The posting continues after the advert…


By now I’m quite sure that knowledgeable people (probably from the old school – or schooled by the old school :-), have already guessed that the African country I’m talking about is MALAWI, and that the ex-president I’m speaking of is none other than HASTINGS BANDA.

In South Africa the psychosomatic terminology of warfare such as, “White Supremacist Regime”, and “White Oppression”, were freely utilized by the international media, to promote ‘change’.  In Malawi, where the government was run entirely by Black people, and not Whites, and hence no one to blame for “oppression” and/or “apartheid”, the target of attack zoomed in on the African leader of that country. He was falsely accused of many things, among others, that he murdered his enemies and fed their corpses to crocodiles, yet – to date, there is not a single shred of evidence that such atrocities ever occurred!

The only enemies Banda had were the Marxist-Communists and their collaborators, whom he, in the interest of upholding law and order, promptly booted out of the country. I suppose he later wished that he had rather fed them to the crocs!

There was one thorny incident in Malawi, in 1983, known as ‘The Mwanza Four incident’ involving four politicians who died mysteriously in what was initially thought to be a traffic accident. It was later discovered they had perished from tent pins hammered into their heads.

Banda was later arrested and charged with their murders -- 10 years later, after demo-craziness conquered the country! He was eventually acquitted due to lack of evidence.

In a BBC interview in the early 1990s, at a time when sporadic cross-border raids by hordes of armed terrorists (oops sorry, I mean freedom fighters) were becoming a real thorn in the flesh for the Christian citizens of Malawi (1000’s were brutally tortured and murdered), Banda jokingly told the BBC reporter - that should his enemies return to cause trouble again, he will feed them to crocodiles. 


As expected, the BBC ran amok with the story, in a very similar fashion they ran amok with several ‘South African’ stories, until the entire world was convinced the stories simply had to be true. In Malawi’s case ‘The Mwanza Four incident’ was repeatedly brought up as “proof” that the country needed the freedom and stability of democracy, in South Africa there was more than sufficient so-called “proofs” that the country needed similar ‘change’ – for the eyes of the world where relentlessly focused on SA and its Police Force, non-stop!

Malawi was the only African nation that recognized ‘apartheid’ South Africa and established diplomatic relations with it, including a trade treaty which angered other African leaders. They threatened to expel Malawi from the Organization of African Unity until Banda left power.

Banda responded by accusing other African countries of hypocrisy, saying in a public speech to his parliament - “There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats.” (Julius Caesar). He told them to concentrate on convincing the South African government that racial segregation (apartheid) was unnecessary. He also cautioned other African leaders to practice disunity, and NOT UNITY, while posing as the liberators of Africa. He once stated: - “While they play in the orchestra of Pan Africanism, their own Romes are burning".  (Source here)

By 1993, Banda was facing international pressure and widespread protest.  A referendum ended his one party state, and the first democratic elections which followed in 1994 placed his opposition, Bakili Muluzi, in power. Muluzi’s ‘democratic’ reign of ten years was fraught with several controversies, including accusations that he had stolen 12 million dollars of aid money. The criminal charges brought against him are too numerous to mention here - (86 in total).


Infuriated supporters of Muluzi often clashed violently with the police and blocked roads, human behaviour that was unheard of in Malawi – i.e. prior to the country becoming a multiparty demo-crazy MESS!

Most informed people are familiar with the latest happenings going on in South Africa... The country is burning, and it’s becoming a really boring and tedious task to blog about. Even the liberals are now admitting (here) that the country has become a gangster state. Religious freedom is gone, and its ‘world-class’ constitution is not worth the paper printed on. Game lodges are being forced to close due to criminal attacks on staff and patrons (story here). Striking workers are bringing the country to its knees. Torture in South African prisons is rampant (story here).  


Note: 
The same story about SA prisons mentions that ANC government has not yet criminalized torture, despite this being one of the obligations of having ratified the United Nations Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment (UN CAT) in 1998.

 

AND THIS IS WHAT THEY CALL “FREEDOM FOR ALL”!!!

It’s enough to make one want to throw up!




Here follows a few excerpts concerning the latest news in “democratic” Malawi:

Troops patrol Malawi towns after 18 killed in protests
By Frank Phiri - Reuters.com

BLANTYRE | Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:25am EDT

Shops were closed and Malawi troops patrolled streets in major urban areas on Friday after rare protests against President Bingu wa Mutharika this week left 18 people dead in the destitute south African state.


The United States and Britain condemned the violence by Malawi authorities and their crackdown on private radio stations trying to report on the violence.

"In light of continued rioting and rumors of retaliation, we urge restraint from both sides," the U.S. embassy in Pretoria said in a statement.

Such unrest is almost unheard of in Malawi, ruled for decades after independence in 1964 by the iron-fisted Hastings Banda, and echoes popular uprisings that have engulfed north Africa and the Middle East over the last seven months.

Health ministry spokesman Henry Chimbali confirmed 10 deaths in the northern cities of Karonga and Mzuzu, where protesters angry at chronic fuel shortages and Mutharika's rule ransacked his Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) offices on Wednesday.


Eight others died in the capital, Lilongwe, and Blantyre after police and troops fired tear gas to disperse crowds demanding Mutharika quit as leader of the nation of 13 million…
Click here to read more.

The following two similar news reports are from News24.com:

Malawi leader defiant as 12 die
2011-07-21 18:58

Blantyre - Malawi President Bingu wa Mutharika on Thursday refused to step down after two days of riots left 12 dead, as anti-government protests turned into looting and running battles with police.

The violence triggered international condemnation ranging from Amnesty International to American pop idol Madonna.

Soldiers were deployed into townships around the capital Lilongwe and the commercial hub Blantyre, clearing the 2 000 protesters who had taken to the streets in each city, accusing Mutharika of mismanaging the economy and trampling on democratic rights…
Click here to read further.

New riots in Malawi, cops deploy in cities
2011-07-21 11:50

Blantyre - At least one person was shot dead on Wednesday when police broke up nationwide protests against President Bingu wa Mutharika, accused by rivals of mismanaging the economy and trampling on democratic freedoms.

Shops closed and many workers headed home early on Thursday as protesters moved through Lilongwe's old town, looting stores as they went, said Mike Chipalasa, spokesperson of the state-funded Malawi Human Rights Commission….
Click here to read further.

PLEASE NOTE: 

The author of this posting had personal firsthand experience with Malawi and its friendly people during the 1990’s, and - for many years thereafter, he has kept in personal contact with professional acquaintances living there. The Malawians known by the author were never too fond of visiting South Africa, because they hated the inhospitable manner in which they were treated, and because they also feared the barbaric savagery of the Blackman.
 

I believe it is not necessary to mention all the online sources consulted for this posting. Google and you shall find!

2 comments :

Anonymous said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

As usual a well researched and accurate article by the author. Every day I think pre 1994 and my border days up north and then this song comes to my mind and I sing it out aloud "Where have all the soldiers gone, long time passing, when will they ever learn, when will they ever learn" Ja ou boet, the good old days, long time passing.

Tia Mysoa said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

@ Anon July 22, 2011 8:55 PM - Thank You!

The song by Roger Whittaker, “I Don't Believe In If Anymore” also comes to mind…

From: http://www.elyrics.net/read/r/roger-whittaker-lyrics/i-don_t-believe-in-if-anymore-lyrics.html

Now if you load your rifle right
And if you fix your bayonet so
And if you kill that man my friend
The one we call the foe
And if you do it often lad
And if you do it right
You'll be a hero overnight
You'll save your country from her plight
Remember God is always right
If you survive to see the sight
A friend now greeting foe

No you won't believe in If anymore
It's an illusion
It's an illusion
No you won't believe in If anymore
If is for children
If is for children
Building daydreams

If I knew then what I know now
(I thought I did you know somehow)
If I could have the time again
I'd take the sunshine leave the rain
If only time would trickle slow
Like rain that melts the fallen snow
If only Lord if only
If only Lord if only….

Where Have All The Flowers Gone
Songwriters: Seeger, Pete;

From: http://www.elyrics.net/read/p/peter,-paul-&-mary-lyrics/where-have-all-the-flowers-gone-lyrics.html

Where have all the flowers gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the flowers gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the flowers gone?
Young girls have picked them everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Where have all the young girls gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the young girls gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the young girls gone?
Gone for husbands everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Where have all the husbands gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the husbands gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the husbands gone?
Gone for soldiers everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Where have all the soldiers gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the soldiers gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the soldiers gone?
Gone to graveyards, everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Where have all the graveyards gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the graveyards gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the graveyards gone?
Gone to flowers, everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Where have all the flowers gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the flowers gone?
Long time ago

Where have all the flowers gone?
Young girls have picked them everyone
Oh, when will they ever learn?
Oh, when will they ever learn?


© SANGA MUSIC INC;

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