Recommended Reading:

Monday, December 27, 2010

A Bloody Merry Festive Season!


Personally, I’ve been having a rather relaxing Festive Season so far. I was dreading that the memories related to the
recent tragic loss of my youngest son, and also my dear father who passed away peacefully soon thereafter, would maybe place a damper on things, but it did not. My strong suspicion that the souls of my two beloved ‘lost’ ones are far from lost, and are in a far better place than this hellhole, has obviously played a role to lessen the sorrow.

The list I have compiled below, which is nowhere near complete, draws attention to the fact that we are living in satan’s world. Pure logical intuition tells me that the state of affairs will not improve. In actual fact it is going to get far worst, but this does not mean that we must now become all terrified and paranoid about the future, for if we do that, then we will most certainly fall headfirst into satan’s trap.

Staying alive (and sane) is becoming quite a challenge in this modern day-and-age. Each individual has their own unique set of rules on how to survive in an ever-hostile world. Some people feel it is wiser to rather ignore what is going on around them, but I disagree with that approach, for it is neither safe nor wise. Although living a healthy balanced life is an essential part of the equation, I also think it is crucial that we stay alert, - read the news, stare at the horrors of reality, evaluate the risks, and take the necessary precautions.

An incomplete list of ‘Festive Season’ horrors:

Comment on Sandi Majali’s death:

Majali is best known for the Oilgate scandal, where he “donated” R11m from PetroSA funds - taxpayers' money - to the ANC ahead of the 2004 elections.
During October 2010 he appeared in the Johannesburg Commercial Crime Court on charges of fraud for allegedly hijacking a mining company, Kalahari Resources. Oddly enough, the National Prosecuting Authority warned that the decision to release the businessman on bail would have "major" implications. I suppose they could not foresee that the implications were going to be so “major” that the man would never be able to speak again!

0 comments :

Latest 5 Featured Posts:

Operation Vula, its Secret Safari, and Zuma’s band of comrades - Dec. 2013
During 1986 the ANC launched an underground operation called Operation Vula. A lesser-known fact is that it continued to operate after Nelson Mandela's release in February 1990, and for three years after his speech in August 1990 when he reiterated the total commitment of the ANC, Umkhonto we Sizwe and the SACP to the Groote Schuur Minute.

Heritage Day Photographs (Voortrekker Monument) - Sept. 2013
This posting includes a few photographs taken on Heritage Day 2013. The posting introduces an unusual but beautiful new structure called QUO VADIS? (with the question mark) which I’m sure many readers have never heard of.

The Yellow-Bucket Marula Tree: A Mystery Solved! - Oct. 2013
I came across a rather strange phenomenon one day while travelling along the R561 route between Tolwe and Baltimore in the Limpopo province of South Africa. A small yellow bucket was attached high-up in a branch of a Marula tree, hence the name of this posting. It’s a real funny story which I’m sure most readers will enjoy - as much as I enjoyed compiling the article  - (with illustrations).

Pretoria’s Monument for Victims of Terrorism - July 2013
Many people (including myself) had almost forgotten about a noteworthy monument in Pretoria that stood at the entrance of the old Munitoria building on the corner of Van der Walt and Vermeulen Streets (now renamed Lilian Ngoyi and Madiba Streets). When the Munitoria building was demolished on 7 July 2013 nobody could tell me whether the monument was still standing or not, so I decided to go look for myself.

Remembering The Battle of Delville Wood - July 2013
14 July marks a day when the South African 1st Infantry Brigade got engaged in the 1916 (WW1) Battle of the Somme, in France. The battle was one of the largest of World War I, in which more than a million men were wounded or killed, making it one of humanity's bloodiest battles. One specific encounter during this battle, known as The Battle of Delville Wood, is of particular importance to South Africa. The posting includes a comprehensive article (with pictures) compiled and written by Petros Kondos.


Blog Feeds - Sister Blogs:

African Countries (Alphabetical list):
(The links will redirect to the Amazon.com page dealing with the specific country.)




JKLS AFRICA



Browse Books By Category