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Sunday, August 15, 2010

Tribute paid to fallen SA soldiers


The annual remembrance service for members of the former South African Defence Force (SADF) was held at the Wall of Remembrance at Voortrekker Monument in Pretoria today.


Picture Credit: topphoto.co.za
The Wall was erected to pay tribute to the members of the SADF who lost their lives in service of their country over the period May 31, 1964 and April 1994 . The Wall was made possible through private donations and contributions in kind. No state funds were used for it. Also close by is the 32 Battalion Tree of Honour which commemorates soldiers of 32 battalion who lost their lives during the border war.

The names of members - including more than 700 who died in operational situations - are engraved on the Wall. More names are added every year as deserving candidates are confirmed.

More than 100 wreaths were laid in remembrance of members of the former SADF. The wall contains the names of some 2 500 members.

"This is for people - to enable them to remember and also to help facilitate closure for those who have lost dear ones during the period of service that we commemorate," says Voortrekker Monument's Gert Opperman.

Military veterans from as far afield as Australia attended the ceremony in solidarity with their colleagues who died in battle. One of those laying wreaths was Chris Taljaard, who travelled from Brazil to attend the service. His brother Danie is one of the fallen soldiers buried in the Ebo district in Angola.

Political parties, former generals, civil rights movements and cultural groups also honoured the fallen soldiers. For some, the Wall is the only place where their loved ones are officially honoured.

Source: www.sabcnews.com

Related Post:

SA Defence Force Wall of Remembrance (Official inauguration of the Wall - 25 October 2009)

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