Tuesday, November 3, 2009

This is NOT a Nigerian Scam Letter


I received a scanned copy of a letter this morning written by Joe Igbokwe, from Lagos, Nigeria. Normally anything that comes from Nigeria would immediately be deleted from my e-mail inbox. Gmail already does a good job of managing spam of this sort, but one still has to be aware of the odd stuff that may slip through.

The letter below is not a hoax. In fact, it is a refreshing account of a black man’s true impressions of South Africa when he ‘discovered’ the country on his first visit here during October 2009. Links to the original article, online as well as print media, are provided at
the end of this posting.

My Revealing South African Experience

SIR: On Thursday October 1, 2009, the National Chairman of our great party Chief Bisi Akande; the Lagos State Chairman of the Party in Lagos, Chief Dele Ajomale; his wife; the representative of the Governor and my humble self left for South Africa to inaugurate the chapter of our party. Business finished on Saturday October 2 and 3, 2009 in both Pretoria and Johannesburg. We had Sunday October 4 to look around. It was my first visit to South Africa and what I saw stunned me.

Am I in Africa or Europe? Am I in America? Is this another Singapore? Could this be true? Where was Nigeria when South Africa was putting all these structures in place? If the white man did all these in South Africa why were the Nelson Mandelas of this world complaining? If South Africans got their independence on a platter of gold the way Nigeria got hers in 1960, would there have been all these structures I am seeing here today? Impossible! From what I saw on ground in South Africa, it looked as if all the companies and industries all over the world are physically present there. Ah! Nigeria has been left behind. South Africa is the potential and undisputable leader in Africa. Thanks to the white South Africans.

I came to the unhappy conclusion that the mosquitoes that drove the whites away from Nigeria in 1960 did a colossal and unmitigated damage to Nigerians. I again asked myself these questions: How many black Africans did the whites kill before surrendering power to them? How many Nigerians have been killed by Nigerian leaders since they took over power from the whites in 1960? Let us compare the figures. I am sure the supreme prize South Africans paid to have the South Africa I see today will be so infinitesimal compared with what our leaders have killed to remain in power in Nigeria.

What I am saying is that God should have allowed the whites to tarry for at least more 30 years in Nigeria and we would have been better for it. Mandela survived 27 years in prison because the whiteman was a better person. He could not have survived 10 years in prison in Nigeria. My conclusion after seeing what I saw in South Africa is that the whites left Nigeria in a hurry, and that is why we are suffering today. Had the whites tarried in Nigeria, Nigeria would have been like South Africa today. I want the whites back in Nigeria!

Joe Igbokwe,
Lagos.

Sources:

Internet - www.ngrguardiannews.com
Print Media – Download newspaper scan here (PDF Doc)


2 comments :

Anonymous said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

I was born in Nigeria when it was a colony and my father was working as a doctor for the British Colonial Service. He used to tell me that many of the ordinary blacks he came into contact with were very worried that the British were pulling out. They knew what their own leaders would be like. The white Colonial period was a brief era of peace and prosperity between the normal African eras of savagery. It was the same in Rhodesia when I was there in the 1970s. Blacks from as far away as Uganda tried to get into the white 'racist' state because they knew that under white rule there would be food and order. Mugabe's 'freedom fighters' used to murder these non-Rhodesian blacks regularly.

Tia Mysoa said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

Dear Anonymous,

Thanks for sharing this on my blog. If only the liberal-minded folk, the unbelievers, and the ‘lukewarm’ Christians, could awake from their slumber, and stop worshiping the black god Mandela and start worshipping the one and only true God -- the Creator of this awesome universe, --- then only will all this satanic chaos come to an end!

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