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Monday, February 2, 2009

Nigerian Drug Dealers



How come the majority of drug dealers apprehended in South Africa happen to be Nigerian?

Despite the fact that this has been going on for years, these scum-of-the-earth still manage to end up back on the streets to continue with their lucrative and lethal trade. Is the judicial system blind to the fact that these drug dealers have unlimited funds at their disposal and that imposing a sentence of 10 years imprisonment with the option of a R60 000 fine, can never act as a deterrent? The courts impose these sentences even on second convictions, as in a recent case in the Richards Bay Magistrate’s Court. Click here to read this story.

What does this tell us? Illegal drug trading is a lucrative trade for everyone involved, including the State Judiciary System. Although the “main spanner”, in the Richards Bay case, got 25 years, I’m willing to bet my left ball that he will be out on a Presidential Pardon, or other loophole in the circus, within 5-years or less.

In a statement issued by the Democratic Alliance (DA) on 24 July 2008, alarming evidence was pointed out, showing that South Africa is the drug capital of Africa. How did the country get into this mess in the first place? Drug smuggling was never a major problem before so-called “democracy” was introduced in April 1994. You very seldom noticed heroin-addicted kids begging on street corners, or drug dealers prowling the streets in luxury German cars. Today it’s a common occurrence in all the major cities of South Africa.

When I see the well-dressed scumbag, barely visible behind tinted windows and stylish sunglasses, sitting smugly behind the wheel of his shiny black BMW, -- the latest high-polished model, equipped with customized mags, nitrogen-filled low-profile tyres, the works!!!, --- my blood pressure soars to the dangerous levels of extreme rage. When this happens I try to convince myself that the chap is an undercover cop. I know it’s not true, but it’s the only way I can control my blood pressure.

In the DA’s report a suggestion was made to reinstate the specialist SAPS Narcotics Bureau (SANAB) which was disbanded, (together with the Child Protection Unit and, now most recently, the Scorpions). I agree 100% with this approach. The DA’s sensible policies and strong stand regarding the drug issue will probably be the main reason why they will get my vote in the coming elections this year.

2 comments :

Willie From: said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

You have a very nice blog keep it going. I have recently updated my blog. To follow my blog click on the words in the lift coulomb of my page "Follow this blog" it is above the pictures of the other followers and complete the pages theta will open. Cum and tell me what you think of my new and learn more about how we live in South Africa by following sum of the links I give on my blog you can even see more interesting things about SA. Visit: http://www.nowinsouthafrica.blogspot.com

Regards
Willie

Tia Mysoa said... .....Click here to refresh this blog

Hi Willie, thanks for popping in, and thanks for the compliments. I visited your blog and must say that it looks pretty neat! I will return often to check for anything new.

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